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Three Indy 500 Drivers Using iRacing – Video

Three Indy 500 Drivers Using iRacing – Video

The famous Indianapolis 500 is coming up on Sunday and while most people are focusing their attention on the 500 mile race on Sunday, the whole event is made up of over two weeks of practice and qualifying.

To kill some of the waiting time in between, three Indycar drivers and iRacing subscribers Justin Wilson, Mike Conway & Tomas Scheckter have been spotted turning some virtual Indy-laps using iRacing’s online racing simulation.

  • Gnomie

    The guy in the middle looks a bit bored the last 10 seconds. 😉

  • DeadStar

    Gnomie: The guy in the middle looks a bit bored the last 10 seconds.

    I think he looks relaxed not bored, he cannot afford to relax in a real situation otherwise he might get hurt.

  • Jos

    shouldn’t be too hard of a track to remember 😛

  • cosmo1973

    The guy in the middle is former F3000 champion and ex F1 driver Justin Wilson.

  • carbonfibre

    It’s the real bump modelling and FFB that makes that as fun as it is.

    It annoys me it’s taken so many decades for sim racing to make this small but giant leap forward for immersion and only iRacing (with it’s annoying subscription) has it so far…

    Actually, The G25 wasn’t out many decades ago so maybe “they” could have focused on making the bump modelling in every sim as good as iRacing after the G25 was introduced which was when-ever lol. :tongue: /pointless comment by me.

  • codename6

    Gnomie: The guy in the middle looks a bit bored the last 10 seconds.

    I would too. left turn, left turn, left turn, left turn…repeat hah :tongue:

  • David Wright

    carbonfibre: It’s the real bump modelling and FFB that makes that as fun as it is. It annoys me it’s taken so many decades for sim racing to make this small but giant leap forward for immersion and only iRacing (with it’s annoying subscription) has it so far…Actually, The G25 wasn’t out many decades ago so maybe “they” could have focused on making the bump modelling in every sim as good as iRacing after the G25 was introduced which was when-ever lol. /pointless comment by me.

    I doubt it has anything to do with the G25. The G25 wasn’t a major step forward in terms of force feedback – its major step forward was the introduction of the clutch pedal and manual shifter to the masses – and iRacing didn’t react to this by fully simulating a manual gearchange.

    And the bumps in non-laser scanned tracks still add immersion for me even if laser scanning is much better. The real problem with laser scanning is cost, and this is presumably why it hasn’t been adopted outside iRacing.

    What I do find amazing is it would seem F1 teams don’t consider laser scanning essential for their simulators.

  • michael

    David Wright:What I do find amazing is it would seem F1 teams don’t consider laser scanning essential for their simulators.

    Well, it’s very expensive to laser scan tracks and why would they care? They have the worlds top drivers. These are not the kind of buffoons who can’t cope with a bump IRL that “wasn’t there in the Sim”

    They aren’t in the business of teaching people to drive. Most of their drivers have driven from around the age of 8.

    I imagine their main criteria for using sims, is teaching folks to get used to the steering wheel controls so they can make quick and accurate changes to brake balance and all the other dials and switches at high speed under pressure without having to think about it, in an environment where it’s precisely because it isn’t realistic that makes it a better tool for them.

    Learning the basic layout of a new track might come a close second, but as I say, it doesn’t really matter that much whether they get every bump and niche or even if the physics are spot on – an F1 driver is just as likely to drive a road car around a track, or walk it, to learn the layout.

    Besides, a laser scanned track will be out of date in respect of bumps and so on pretty quickly.

    No, laser scanning like “absolutely authentic physics” is really just a way of selling games to wannabees. The guys writing the games want to kid folk they are playing something that’s real and laser scanning is, realtively speaking, low hanging fruit compared with the myriad other aspects they can’t do. Although it’s interesting that F1 2010 decided not to waste their money in the end.

  • NicoloPicolo

    FYI Michael, Williams laser scan the tracks, Ferrari too.
    This makes your comment pretty funny and irrelevant…

  • Jack B

    Mike Conway was the driver in the horrible last lap crash up over the wall on Sunday. I think he’s ok, other than a problem with his foot.

  • moppenheimer

    Jack B: Mike Conway was the driver in the horrible last lap crash up over the wall on Sunday.I think he’s ok, other than a problem with his foot.

    Broken leg and Back

  • michael

    NicoloPicolo: FYI Michael, Williams laser scan the tracks, Ferrari too.
    This makes your comment pretty funny and irrelevant…

    Not really, F1 guys do it for real. The guys in these iracing videos are no different to David Beckham wearing fancy y-fronts in a Calvin Klein ad.

    Although Williams would probably prefer Sim racing to F1 as the only time they could win anything was when the car was controlled by computer 🙂

    Ferrari will spend 10x the money anyone else will on anything (often to get half the results)

    Even in the Redbull simulator video just posted they talk about comparing real life setups with the ones they get from the simulator.

    Nice. However, the viewpoint Webber gives to the naive is arse about face imo. They are using the real world to correct the sim and not the other way around…and use the sim for test drivers and new drivers for precisely the reasons I stated.

    Plus, of course, they are using their own data and models (it’s not new or a surprise that F1 teams and motorsport will use CAD and simulation software to develop / improve their car. That is, however, firstly pretty irrelevant from the POV of developing a computer game-like driving experience from the data, and they obviously test in real wind tunnels and later, on real tracks)

  • Jack B

    Michael, laser scanned tracks and trackside landmarks used as visual clues for turn in etc. are better than non laser scanned tracks.

    Guessing on the banking, bumps, exact incline and camber of a turn isn’t as good as knowing the exact banking, bumps, incline and camber of a corner at all points on a corner. Each corner in real life is a work of art. Anyone who thought about that for a minute would realize that’s true.

    Thanks for playing.

  • Jack B

    Jack B: Michael, laser scanned tracks and trackside landmarks used as visual clues for turn in etc. are better than on laser scanned tracks. Guessing on the banking and camber of a turn isn’t as good as knowing the exact banking and camber of a corner at all points on a corner. Each corner in real life is a work of art.

    Thanks for playing.

  • NicoloPicolo

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